10 Paramount Things about Nancy Verrier’s “The Primal Wound”

The Primal Wound: Understanding the Adopted Child

by Nancy Verrier

Nikki’s Rating: 10 out of 10

Summary: A book meant for anyone involved in adoption, “The Primal Wound” explores the trauma that all adoptees experience through the process of adoption. With emphasize on the adoptee’s experience, Verrier provides information on how best adoptive parents, biological parents, and the adult adoptee can help themselves and heal from this trauma.


10 Paramount Things about Nancy Verrier’s “The Primal Wound”

(May Contain Spoilers)

1. Adoption

Even though 6 out of 10 Americans have had a personal experience with adoption (themselves or close family/friend has adopted a child or put up a child for adoption), adoption is not an openly discussed topic. Verrier shares new insight and knowledge on this stigmatized subject.

2. Nancy Verrier

The author of “The Primal Wound”, Nancy Verrier is an adoptive mother and it was her personal experience with her adopted daughter that brought her to doing research on adoption and the trauma that occurs. Personal experience brings so much more substance and Verrier is able to provide a wealth of knowledge because of this.

3. Adoption Triad

“The Primal Wound” addresses the whole adoption triad: the adopted child, the biological mother, and the adoptive mother. It is written in a way that any individual in the role of the adoption triad should be able to understand and empathize with another role in the triad.

4. No Blame

Verrier makes a point to stress multiple times in “The Primal Wound” that the biological mother is not to blame for the trauma experienced by adoptees. Instead, she points to society as a whole for lacking resources that could have been available so that she could have kept her child. Improper treatment of drug addiction and/or mental health, poverty, unaffordable childcare, lack of sexual education, etc. are issues that many women face that may contribute to placing their child up for adoption.

5. References

Verrier meticulously cites multiple references and sources throughout “The Primal Wound” providing credence to her work and theories.

6. Validating

As an adoptee, “The Primal Wound” was so validating. A must-read for any adoptee, adoptive parent, or biological parent of an adopted child!

7. Suggested Reading

A super helpful list of other books is listed at the end of “The Primal Wound” to help readers further explore their interest in adoption and/or issues that may arise from being part of the adoption triad.

8. Issues

“The Primal Wound” does an amazing job of presenting all the issues and challenges people can experience if they are part of an adoption triad, especially for the adoptee. Self-esteem, attachment styles, intimacy problems, guilt, mourning, etc are all addressed.

9. Solutions

Not only does Verrier present the multiple issues that may arise from the experience of adoption, she also makes suggestions on how to solve some of these issues, especially by going to therapy.

10. The Writing

While “The Primal Wound” is a wealth of information, it never seems overwhelming or confusing. Verrier presents her supported theories clearly and includes her own personal experiences or those of people she interviewed to provide examples.

What are your favorite things about Nancy Verrier’s “The Primal Wound”?


Be Authentic. Be Unique. Be You.

As always, thank you for reading. I would love to hear from you so feel free to contact me or comment below. And if you would like to support this blog and/or my paintings please become my patron.

Book Reviews of 2018

Young Adult Books

Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas:

Empire of Storms

Tower of Dawn

Kingdom of Ash

Caraval Series by Stephanie Garber:

Caraval

Legendary
Shatter Me series by Tahereh Mafi:

Shatter Me

Unravel Me

Ignite Me

Restore Me

Self-Help Books

Romance Novels

Lords of the Underworld series by Gena Showalter:

Into the Dark

After Dark

The Darkest Torment

The Darkest Promise

Non-Fiction

Historical Fiction


Book Reviews of October 2018

Book Reviews of October 2018

Attached:  The New Science of Adult Attachment and How it Can Help You Find -And Keep- Love by Amir Levine and Rachel S.F. Heller41jqaseWDkL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

51nyS4ictWL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_Ignite Me: Shatter Me Book 3 by Tahereh Mafi

519kRg3AZCL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

 

 

Running on Empty: Overcome Your Childhood Emotional Neglect by Jonice Webb, PhD with Christine Musello, PsyD

 

Restore Me: Shatter Me Book 4 by Tahereh Mafi41qA7M5LzGL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

51Zuw7b8ytL._AC_US218_

First They Killed My Father: a daughter of Cambodia remembers by Loung Ung

 

51jbDr01MyL._SX314_BO1,204,203,200_The Darkest Torment: Lords of the Underworld Book 12 by Gena Showalter

Book Reviews of August 2018

51JGlve9rKL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown

51S-OSUUyzL._AC_US218_

 

Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

 

 

 

515bwcoTZEL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Too Good to Leave, Too Bad to Stay by Mira Kirshenbaum

 

 

 

 

Update: Starting this month my book reviews will be changing, again. I’m still experiencing the problem of reading books faster than I can review them so reviews will be even shorter! Short, sweet, and concise is what I’m going for, hopefully it works out!

As Always:

Be Authentic. Be Unique. Be You.